Stained glass is one of the few art forms that necessarily changes with the seasons, the time of day, and quality of natural light. As summer slips into autumn, the glow of stained glass alters; colors become muted or near neon, figures fade or stand out in the dark of an interior. Medieval stained glass has this remarkable fluidity of appearance, but these monumental undertakings were aimed for permanence. Church officials and noblemen financed the visions of architects and artisans, and the results are breathtaking and vivid. In Stained Glass: Radiant Art, Virginia Chieffo Raguin offers a richly illustrated primer on the stained glass collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum. 
Above: Heraldic Panel with the Arms of the Eberler Family
Unknown Swiss, possibly from Basel, about 1490 Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, and silver stain
Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum 

Stained glass is one of the few art forms that necessarily changes with the seasons, the time of day, and quality of natural light. As summer slips into autumn, the glow of stained glass alters; colors become muted or near neon, figures fade or stand out in the dark of an interior. Medieval stained glass has this remarkable fluidity of appearance, but these monumental undertakings were aimed for permanence. Church officials and noblemen financed the visions of architects and artisans, and the results are breathtaking and vivid. In Stained Glass: Radiant Art, Virginia Chieffo Raguin offers a richly illustrated primer on the stained glass collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum. 

Above: Heraldic Panel with the Arms of the Eberler Family

Unknown 
Swiss, possibly from Basel, about 1490 
Pot-metal and clear glass, black and brown vitreous paint, and silver stain

Los Angeles, The J. Paul Getty Museum